Mitigation banking is the preservation, enhancement, restoration, or creation of a wetland, stream, or habitat conservation area which offsets, or compensates for, expected adverse impacts to similar nearby ecosystems. Freshwater Land Trust has conservation easements on the below properties.

Yellowleaf in Shelby County (547.2 acres)

This mitigation bank is particularly valuable because of its proximity to Birmingham. Two extremely rare and endangered mussel species (the triangular kidneyshell and southern clubshell) are found in the area along with the state-protected mussel species (the Alabama spike) and one plant species of special concern (the Cahaba lily).

Big Sandy I (1,060 acres) and Big Sandy II (72.87 acres) in Tuscaloosa County

Enhancing the Big Sandy Creek ecosystem will increase the likelihood of long-term survival and species richness for a diversity of aquatic biota and wetland wildlife.

Locust Fork in Blount County (111.4 acres)

The Locust Fork River is known for its richness of aquatic invertebrates including several endangered mussel, fish, and snail species.

Selma Dixon in Dallas County (93 acres)

This mitigation bank will rehabilitate over 5,000 linear feet of stream, resulting in improved water quality and wildlife habitat along the Cahaba River and downstream where the Cahaba meets the Alabama River.

Shultz Creek in Tuscaloosa County (54 acres)

This mitigation bank will restore land that was previously a loblolly pine plantation back to its original state as a mixed hardwoods forest, in turn increasing native hardwoods species richness and diversity. Upon restoration, this mitigation bank could provide suitable habitat for local endangered species such as the Indiana bat and the Northern long-eared bat.

Westervelt Mitigation Bank in Bibb County (290 acres)

This mitigation bank will restore 9,139 linear feet of freshwater streams, 186 acres of riparian buffer, and permanently preserve 100 acres of streamside forest, potentially providing habitat for some of Alabama’s rare species, like the gray bat, red-cockaded woodpecker, flattened musk turtle, and Black Warrior waterdog.

Downey Branch in Walker County (127 acres)

This mitigation bank will enhance  6,943 linear feet of freshwater streams, including 1,481 linear feet of Downey Branch, which will potentially provide habitat for endangered aquatic species, like the rush darter, flattened musk turtle, and Black Warrior waterdog.

Buck Creek in Walker County (156 acres)

This mitigation bank will restore a large wetland ecosystem that, once established, will dramatically improve water quality and provide additional wildlife habitat in one of the most biodiverse regions in the United States.

Mud Creek in Jefferson County (125 acres)

This mitigation bank will restore nearly 24,412 linear feet of Mud Creek, as well as enhance hardwood wetland habitat. Once complete, this project will improve water quality, provide additional wildlife habitat, and ensure that the property’s natural resources will remain protected.